November 22, 2008

on the farm






I got a last minute call from my friend Heith inviting me to join him and his friends Mondo and Dustin for a day at Knotts Berry Farm today. Knotts is having a pretty incredible deal - through Nov 27, any military member or veteran gets free admission for them and a guest, plus can buy tickets for six more people at $15 each. Considering that admission is normally $51, thats no small savings. And they've had that deal for almost all of November, not just a weekend. When we got there, Dustin realized he had forgotten his military ID, but it turns out that they are also having the same deal for Police and Fire from now til December 21, so I was able to get us in and get their tix for $15. Mondo and Dustin were great sports in jumping on one of the biggest coasters there as soon as we got there, even though they aren't fans of the wilder rides. Knotts is smaller than some of it competitors, but its a quality park, plus I find its history fascinating. Knott's, not surprisingly, actually started as a Berry Farm in the 20's. Their berry stand grew to a restaurant famous for its chicken dinners, and lines got so long that in the 40's, they built an old west ghost town to entertain visitors. Attractions were added over time and in 1968, they fenced it off to charge single admission as a theme park. Knott's, by the way, is also where Boysenberries were invented. They still serve chicken dinners and boysenberry pie today.

3 comments:

langolier said...

Just how do you 'invent' a berry?

dad

jon berry said...

I guess by cross-breeding - I don't know if thats what you call it in agriculture though... I supposed invented isn't the right word, either; more like created? kinda like seedless grapes...

Jim said...

We love Knott's Berry Farm. And wether it's invented or cross-bred, we love Boysenberry. Knott's used to have a great selection of unusual jams and dressings and we'd always stock up everytime we visit. Unfortunately, some large food company took over and now they only produce the usual middle-of-the road products. Oh well, at least they still have great roller coasters.